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The Life of Flowers

Vladimir Vorobyov created a mesmerizing time-lapse video of a myriad of flowering plants as they begin to bloom. It’s an explosion of colour timed to a very enthusiastic composition, Happy-go-lucky, by Patrick Hawes. It’s sure to put a smile on your face. It did mine, but maybe I’m easily amused. Check out The Life of Flowers below.

[via Vimeo]

HP Scanjet Sings “Somebody That I Used to Know” in This Old School Computer Remix

There are many many covers and parodies of Gotye’s unavoidable track “Somebody That I Used to Know”, so much so that the singer himself created a supercut, stitching together over 100 YouTube fan clips.

It would have been the cover to end all covers had it not been for YouTube user bd594 who recreates the song using an unlikely band of musicians. Watch as a troupe of hard drives and oscilloscopes provides the bassline and an HP Scanjet 3C stands in for the vocalists in this old school computer remix of “Somebody That I Used to Know”.

[via @nxtrms]

We Review: Transformers: Fall of Cybertron

Transformers: War for Cybertron was surprisingly good. It bucked the trend that movie tie-in games were invariably crap. That’s because it wasn’t a tie-in at all. Developers High Moon Studios based their 2010 big bot adventure on the home world of Cybertron where the Autobots and Decepticons were in the midst of a civil war. The two leaders are polar opposites, the optimist prime versus the negatron you could say, but their actions together brought about big trouble to Cybertron.

Transformers: Fall of Cybertron follows on from the events of previous title, where the Autobots are desperate to find a way off the dying planet. Optimus has commissioned the creation of a giant lifeboat upon which he and the remaining Autobots would evacuate. The Decepticons not only want to disrupt the Autobots but have some other plans in the making. Transformers: Fall of Cybertron tells the stories around this desperate tug-of-war contest. See how it unfolds after the jump.

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Drug-Induced Self-Portraits by Bryan Lewis Saunders

Some of us are fairly aware how drugs can alter our perception of the world. Artist Bryan Lewis Saunders took this to the extreme in an experiment where he ingested a different drug every day and then drew a picture of himself.

Since 1995 Saunders has been drawing daily self-portraits but it wasn’t until 2001 when he introduced drugs into his system and his art. He believes the 45-day experiment may have caused some slight brain damage and that the drugs made him look really ugly. From the colourful childish influences of marijuana to the calming effects of Ambien to monstrous world of bath salts, have a look at how the different chemicals in the drugs altered Saunders’ perception of self.

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We Review: Wizorb

We’ve seen some fairly strange video game genre mashups happen, and they’ve had various amounts of success. Just when I think they couldn’t jam more genres together, the folks at Tribute Games manage something I’ve not seen before: the mixup of an Arkanoid game with an 8-bit RPG. Does it work? Let’s find out.

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Gallagher Smash!

American comedian Gallagher has a penchant for glitter and destruction. Shot on a Phantom Miro and set to the tune of Bijoux by Caribou, the super slow-motion video shows Gallagher doing what he does (second) best — smashing watermelons with his trademark wooden mallet, the Sledge-O-Matic. Beware though, seeing a topless 66-year-old wielding a fiery mallet cannot be easily unseen.

The video was shot by the creatives at Fiction.

[via Gizmodo]

We Review: Darksiders 2

I loved the first Darksiders. From the whodunnit storyline, to the dungeon crawling, to the hacks and slashes, the experience was surprising as it was thrilling. I am a man of simple needs and when I heard that a sequel was in development, I would have been extremely happy to play one with mechanics similar to the first, just with a different character. But without change there is no progress as some people would say. And in Darksiders 2, Vigil Games were not horsing around when they added wholly new gameplay elements to the mix. Do these new elements dilute the experience? Do they welcome new types of players to the game but alienate others? Does bigger mean it’s better? Let’s dance with Death and find out.

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The Story of Oedipus, Performed by Vegetables

Sigmund Freud’s theory of the Oedipus complex says that a certain neurosis where a male child unconsciously desires to kill his father and have sexual relations with his mother. His theory is based on the legend of Oedipus.

In his creative short film, Jason Wishnow tells the tragic tale of Oedipus using the most unlikely actors—vegetables. The stop-motion film took two years to create and starts in medias res where the adult Oedipus, played by a potato, is travelling to Thebes and encounters a piece of broccoli driving a chariot. Neither wants to let the other go first and a fight breaks out. Oedipus kills the offending floret and unwittingly fulfils the first part of a disturbing prophecy. See what happens next below, but be warned, the film contains scenes of vegetable sensuality.

[via Vimeo]

Versus/Hearts

Tom and Jerry. Alien versus Predator. Android versus iOS. It’s these rivalries that are at the heart of the cute illustrations by Dan Matutina, an illustrator based in the Philippines. Matutina depicts the love/hate bond between characters from popular culture in the shape of a heart, with each rival making up a symbiotic half of the heart/relationship.

Have a look at some of Matutina’s Versus/Hearts after the jump.

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We Review: Project Zero 2 Wii Edition

The Wii has mostly been seen as a console for kids or casual gamers, and not really friendly to hardcore gamers. Disproving this view is a Wii remake of a PS2 horror game: Project Zero 2 (called Fatal Frame 2 on the PS2). I braved the chills and scares of this haunting game to bring you this review.

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