If you’ve completely exhausted the two story paths in Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright and Fire Emblem Fates: Conquest (both games reviewed here), and you wished there was more story to tell, you’re in luck. A piece of DLC for the game, Fire Emblem Fates: Revelation, shows you the consequences of not choosing, and that making no choice is in itself a choice.

You lucky people who buy the special edition of Fire Emblem Fates will be getting the Revelation DLC as part of the package. Be glad, because it’s actually a superior experience to either Birthright or Conquest. The story starts in exactly the same place as the others: the choice to side with Hoshido or with Nohr, but in this case, your chosen Hero/Heroine chooses neither, and attempts to show that another way exists to bring peace to the land. If you played through Birthright, you’ll know that it comes to a fairly satisfying conclusion, whereas Conquest was slightly less so. Revelation takes a middle of the road view. It’s not as difficult as Conquest (which, admit it, could get fairly taxing in some levels), nor as straightforwardly simple as Birthright. It doesn’t offer as many side missions as Birthright does, nor leaves you with a complete dearth of ways to level up characters in the way Conquest does. The best part about Revelation is that the ending it gives you is so much more satisfying than either of the base games.

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Revelation isn’t a standard piece of DLC: it’s an entire game in its own right, really, since it’s a third path in the line of fate for your character. It was interesting to see where the stories twined and intersected. In terms of the Castle you get access to, you’re able to construct units and buildings from both Nohr and Hoshido, allowing you to cater to the build of your party adequately, since members of your party will come from both sides over the course of Revelation’s story. It’s quite touching, really.

If you enjoyed Fire Emblem Fates as much as I’d hoped you would, you absolutely have to play Revelation if only to see how the game’s story really should come out. It’s a step up in difficulty if you enjoyed Birthright, but a welcome break from the difficulty in Conquest. Naturally, you’ll need to already have a copy of either Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright or Fire Emblem Fates: Conquest to play Fire Emblem Fates: Revelation, but like much of Nintendo’s DLC, it makes for a much, much better game.

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