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Category: Inspirational Designs (page 1 of 10)

Hello, Phabulous Phablet!

It’s Mission Samsung time again, folks, and this time around, the wonderful folk at Samsung sent me a Galaxy Note 4 to integrate into my life for a week. For those of you who don’t know, the Galaxy Note 4 is somewhere in between “phone” and “tablet”, and thus it was dubbed the “phablet”. Which sounds a little like what would come from a union of Pharrel Williams and Kate Winslet. One of the best features of the Galaxy Note 4 is that is includes a stylus called the S-Pen, which, among other things, allows for a greater degree of precision and control when writing on the screen.

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“Ukiyo-e Heroes” Turns Video Game Characters Into Japanese Woodblock Art

Illustrator Jed Henry loves the old Japanese art of ukiyo-e, a type of woodblock printing (The Great Wave off Kanagawa is a wonderful example of this technique.) Henry also has a fondness for video games, and as artists like to do, he decided to mash both passions together.

In Ukiyo-e Heroes, Henry has researched and drawn a selection of Nintendo video game characters in the Japanese ukiyo-e style. There are currently 12 designs that feature Mario, Link, Samus, Mega Man, Donkey Kong, Simon Belmont, and a wonderful panel of Street Fighter characters. Have a look at some of Henry’s artwork after the jump.

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World’s Smallest Aquarium is Super Cute

Anatoly Konenko is a Russian artist who specializes in miniatures, so much so that he even has Guinness World Record to his name. In 1996, Konenko created a 30-page, 0.9 mm by 0.9 mm book complete with text (and illustrations!), and won the award for the world’s smallest printed book.

Carrying on the theme of microminiature as he has done for 30 years, Konenko has recently created the tiniest of aquariums. Measuring just 30mm wide, 24mm high, and 14 mm deep, the glass tank holds 10 ml of water, plants, stones, and teeny-weeny fish! He uses a itty-bitty net to place the little Zebrafish into their home, and he has even crafted a water purification filter to keep the habitat clean and healthy. You must see images of this adorable little aquarium after the jump.

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Amazing Light Paintings by Trevor Williams

Trevor Williams is a camera freak who loves light painting and shooting things in the dead of night. He is a part of Fiz-iks, a bunch of photographers based in Japan who specialize in light painting. Williams uses a variety of xenon torches, LED lights, electroluminescent wire (el wire), and other doodads to create some fabulous light paintings. Take a look at some of his art after the jump.

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Wonderful Wildlife by Iain Macarthur

Freelance illustrator Iain Macarthur from Swindon, UK uses intricate geometrical patterns to create the faces and bodies of the animals in his series entitled “Wildlife”. The line work is fantastic and detail is absolutely amazing, they’d made fantastic tattoos I wager. Have a look at his wonderful wildlife portraits after the jump.

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Intricate Cardboard Sculptures Created by Algorithms

Oh my, maths can indeed be pretty. As an architect and programmer, Michael Hansmeyer uses mathematics a great deal in his life, saying that however complex a task may be, there is an algorithm that can describe it. And through CAD applications and various digital fabrication processes, algorithms can not only be visualized but they can be built. And this is what Hansmeyer did. He created a model of a Greek column and then applied an algorithm to it to enhance the details.

Hansmeyer’s intricately detailed model contained several million faces which standard 3D printers can’t handle so he resorted to a manual, pain-staking method of making his subdivided columns a reality.

The result is a 3D model with between 8 and 16 million faces, but 3D printers can only handle half a million, so Hansmeyer needed an alternative solution to transform his creations from virtual to physical reality. He sliced the column into 2700 pieces and used a laser cutter to create each slice from 1mm-thick cardboard, then reconstructed the column by layering the slices together with a solid wooden core. The whole process only cost $1500 and took about 15 hours, with three laser cutters working in parallel.

Have a look at his incredible cardboard sculptures that he built after the jump.

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Tall Painting is Awesome

Oh my, what a wonderful idea. This video directed by Dave Kaufman shows the painting style of a New York-based artist, Holton Rower. Instead of restricting his painting on flat canvases, Rower uses gravity to shape his colourful pieces.

Kaufman has also created a time-lapse video of this painting process. Have a look at that after the jump.

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Intricate Salt Labyrinths

For the past decade, incredibly patient Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto has been creating the most intricate mazes from an unlikely medium. As a tribute to the life of his sister who died of cancer in 1994, Yamamoto spends hours upon hours using a plastic squeezy bottle to create beautiful labyrinthine patterns from household salt.

In an interview with Hi-Fructose, Yamamoto explains the use of salt in his memorial artwork.

Salt seems to possess a close relation with human life beyond time and space. Moreover, especially in Japan, it is indispensable in the death culture. After my sister’s death, what I began to do in order to accept this reality was examine how death was dealt with in the present social realm. I posed several related themes for myself such as brain death or terminal medical care and picked related materials accordingly. I then came to choose salt as a material for my work. This was when I started to focus on death customs in Japan.

… Drawing a labyrinth with salt is like following a trace of my memory. Memories seem to change and vanish as time goes by. However, what I sought for was the way in which I could touch a precious moment in my memories, which cannot be attained through pictures or writings.

Have a look at his salt labyrinths after the jump.

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Wonderful Light Graffiti by Michael Bosanko

What may look like fantastic Photoshop manipulations are in truth made using a variety of coloured torches and digital camera set to a long exposure. Welsh photographer Michael Bosanko creates the most wonderful images of light graffiti in the urban environments of Cardiff and Newport. When creating light graffiti, Bosanko sets the exposure from a little as 10 seconds to almost an hour. He explains that his seven-year fascination of light painting came about in a chance encounter on a holiday to Greece.

“I was taking a picture of a very bright moon one evening when I noticed a swirling effect because the exposure had been left too long. I then realised the beginning of my work in light art and have continued ever since.”

Have a look at a few of his wonderful light art images after the jump.

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Shinichi Maruyama’s Amazing Water Sculptures

Born in Nagano Japan but working in New York City, photographer Shinchi Maruyama makes art with materials of a transient nature. Using a combination of high-speed strobe light photography and water, Maruyama creates beautiful sculptures that are here one moment and gone the next. The following video shows this spontaneous process.

Maruyama is also famous for his “Kusho”, another series of liquids in motion. For this, he flung a type of calligraphy ink into the air and photographed the abtract forms created. This video is also lacking a soundtrack so feel free to imagine “Intro” by The XX is playing in the background.

And have a look at some of his images after the jump.

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