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Category: Science & Technology (page 2 of 13)

To the Moon in 8,400 Photos

NASA’s Apollo space program is most known for the manned moon landings that took place in the late 60s and early 70s. You’ll remember forerunners like Apollo 7, the first mission to carry a crew into space and broadcast live TV broadcast from the craft, and Apollo 10 the “dress rehearsal” to Apollo 11 which landed the first humans on the Moon. And there was the ill-fated Apollo 13, which you might not have known about if it hadn’t been for Tom Hanks.

Four decades later, we get to see some incredible – and previously unreleased – high resolution photos from the various Apollo missions. Thanks to archivist Kipp Teague from the Project Apollo Archive, 8,400 images from the missions have been uploaded to Flickr and conveniently organized. There’s some incredible details on the space craft, fantastic views of the moon and looking back at the earth, and even some candid shots of the astronauts. Have a look at some of those images.

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Cymatics: Sound Made Visible

Cymatics is the process of making sound waves visible, and artist Nigel Standford shows just how that is done in a fantastic set of six audio-based science experiments. In one such experiment, Standford sends audio frequencies through a Chladni plate covered in sand and records the patterns that form in the sand. And in another experiment, he tapes a hose to a speaker and by matching the audio frequencies to the camera’s frame rate, he creates an illusion of water forming a spiral as it leaves the hose. It’s all very fascinating.

Check out CYMATICS: Science Vs. Music below.

To see the behind-the-scenes footage of these audio experiments, check out nigelstanford.com/Cymatics.

[via Colossal]

X-Ray GIFs Show Your Joints at Work

Medical personnel have access to the best equipment. Orthopedic physician Dr. Noah Weiss is no exception. The good doctor partnered with graphic designer Cameron Drake to produce a set of X-ray GIFs that show how the joints in our human body move relative to each other. It’s a beautiful orchestration. Check them out after the jump.

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Prince Rupert’s Drop

What happens when you drip molten glass into cold water? You get a Prince Rupert’s Drop. It looks like a tadpole, with a bulbous head and a thin long tail. It also possesses some interesting properties — the drop can withstand blows from a hammer on one end but even the slightest damage to the tail will result in a shattering EXPLOSION. Destin from the YouTube science channel Smarter Every Day films this amazing interaction at 100,000 frames a second. Check it out below.

[thanks Claire!]

Our Favourite Space Images From 2013

Space is big. Really big. It would take a gargantuan trek of 21.24 billion kilometres for you to reach the outer edges of our solar system, and a further 435 sextillion (that’s 10 to the power of 21!) kilometres to reach the furthest region of the observable universe. There is so much to explore but what we’ve seen so far has been incredibly beautiful.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory keeps an extensive catalogue of cosmic images taken by the various spacecraft up in the heavens. Here’s a small selection of our favourites space images taken in 2013.

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The Chemistry of Cookies

TED-Ed tells us about the magic science of baking cookies. In this minimalist animated short, we’re taken through the series of chemical reactions that flatten the cookie dough, kill any nasty Salmonella, and give the cookie its enticing aroma.

Have a look at The Chemistry of Cookies below.

[via NPR]

Our Home in Space

Created by German design studio, Kurzgesagt, this informative, minimalist animation takes us on a tour through the solar system, stopping off at each of the eights planets to provide a few factoids you may or may not know. The flat design and bright trendy colours belie a rather dark and inevitable truth…

[via FastCo]

Stephen Hawking’s Big Ideas…Made Simple

In A Brief History of Time, everyone’s favourite theoretical physicist, Stephen Hawking, tries to explain complex cosmological concepts to the non-scientific layman. If you don’t have the time to read the 212-page bestseller, have a look at this wonderful cutout animation produced by The Guardian, where messieurs Hawking and Penrose explore the cosmos to find out what is at the centre of a black hole.

This video is part of the The Guardian’s Made Simple series. You can see the other videos here.

[via FastCo]

Waltzing Around Saturn

Not having the best Monday? Boss telling you that you don’t know Uranus from your elbow? I know that feeling too.

Get away from it all (even if temporarily) by watching this most wonderful time-lapse video. The 2.5-tonne spacecraft Cassini–Huygens will be your chauffeur on this tour of the Saturn’s rings and icy moons, set to a dreamy classical piece by Shostakovich.

Around Saturn was put together by Fabio di Donato who pieced together more than 200,000 images taken by the Cassini as it whizzed around Saturn’s rings from 2004 to 2012.

[via io9]

Bloody Norah! This Jet Bicycle is Ridiculous

You thought Wile E. Coyote was crazy for attaching a pair of ACME rocket-powered roller skates to his feet. Colin Furze is a tad bonkers too. A plumber by day, hobbyist inventor by night, Furze had a few screws loose when he created “Norah”. Using pulsejet technology, the mad inventor fitted the pulse jet onto a rickety ladies bicycle, transforming Norah into one hot bike! Watch as the world’s most dangerous bicycle fires into action and blasts the maniacally-laughing Furze down the road at 50 mph.

[via @Mallix]