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Tag: infographics (page 2 of 3)

What Are the Hardest Languages to Learn?

I love languages, and I’ve personally found that the more languages you know, the funnier the world becomes. Having said that, I’m only totally proficient in a single language (i.e. English), although I’ve got enough bits and bobs of other languages to tell me when the subtitles in foreign TV shows are bullshitting me. How hard is it to learn a new language though? What are the hardest languages to learn, assuming a first language of English? Funny you should ask, because Voxy blog have an infographic that answers just that question. See the infographic after the break.

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Indiana Jones Explains The 2011 Egyptian Situation

In case you haven’t heard, there’s some kind of revolution going on in Egypt right now. Apparently, they feel that the current president (who has been in power for the past 30 years) is a complete bell-end. Naturally, this means all sorts of fun things like marches, rallies, demonstrations, shooting, maiming, looting, and shutting down of Internets. To put all of this into some kind of easy-to-understand perspective, Twitter user furrygirl created this delightful precis of the goings on. Full image after the jump.

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The State of Wikipedia

You may remember that almost a year ago, JESS3 made a fantastic visualization about the Internet (see it here). Just the other day they released yet another animated infographic, this time on the beloved collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia, which so happens to be celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. It’s a fascinating look at the inception of this online encyclopedia, the phenomenal amount of interest in it, and contributions made to it. Check it out below.

See and read more about the project at www.thestateofwikipedia.com.

[via Brain Picker on Twitter]

200 Countries, 200 Years, 4 Minutes

Hans Rosling is a Swedish professor with a penchant for statistics and sword-swallowing (it says so on Wikipedia). And in an episode of “The Joy of Stats” on BBC Four the charismatic Rosling, with the help of some computer boffins, shows the life expectancy of people plotted against their income. He does this for 200 countries over the last two centuries using 120,000 numbers, and he does this all in four minutes, stopping at important junctures in the history of our world. Statistic is made that much more interesting and informative when it involves CGI and augmented reality. Check it out below.

Pretty neat, eh? Rosling also helped to create Gapminder, a Flash application that shows statistical data in the form of interactive bubble charts. Have a look at the data from the above video on Gapminder. If you’re on Twitter, you can follow Rosling.

[via Blyzz616 on Twitter]

His and Hers Colours

As witnessed from the results of a hue test, I’m pretty awful with colours. It’s in serious fail territory if I have to go about naming them. And I’m not the only one who feels this way.

Scientist Stephen Von Worley took the 5+ million results from a colour survey conducted by XKCD and created an interactive infographic that shows the differences between men and women when it comes to colours. Von Worley plots the 2,000 most commonly-used colour names as a series of dots on a graph. The size of the colour dot indicates how common the colour is and the horizontal axis divides the gender – women tend to use colour names towards the top part, men uses one the bottom part, and dividing line represents the 50-50 split between the sexes.

It’s interesting to see the different colour preferences. While men seem to use some lolworthy descriptions like goblin green, vomit yellow, shit, and really dark blue, women tend to prefer colours like chartruese, antique rose, dark cornflower, and islamic green.

See the interactive version of the infographic on Data Pointed. Mouse over the dots for more information and read Von Worley’s writeup.

[via iamFinch on Twitter]

A Handy Guide to Rock-Paper-Scissors

I’m pretty terrible at rock-paper-scissors. People say I’m easier to read than a children’s colouring book. Those people are assholes.

Quite frankly I’ve always thought rock-paper-scissors was a game of blind luck but according to a handy infographic from the World RPS Society, it’s a more complex combination of strategy, skill, and observation. If you’re having trouble getting to grips with RPS, then educate yourself after the jump.

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Airspace Rebooted

You may (should) remember the volcanic eruptions at Eyjafjallajökull (pronunciation) in Iceland. The volcano spewed lava and sent out a plume of ash several kilometres up in the atmosphere. The lightning produced in the volcanic plume created a spectacular electrical phenomenon known as a dirty thunderstorm. For fear the that the ash may damage aircraft engines, the airspace of many European countries were closed off, leaving travellers stranded. One could not simply fly into Europe.

Air travel was disrupted from April 15th to April 20th and this data visualization shows the northern European airspace during that time.

For some fantastic images of Eyjafjallaj√∂kull, check out The Big Picture’s coverage here and there.

[via Gizmodo | KiTTGT]

Japan – The Strange Country

I don’t think we need to tell anyone that the Japanese can be a little odd. Of all the places in the far east I’d like to visit, Japan certainly ranks high up there. The kooky, off-the-wall antics of our slitty-eyed friends just appeals to me. To quote Tracy Morgan from Cop Out, I love you like the fat kid loves cake!

So we’re fans of Japan and of infographics so when I spotted this I was compelled to post it. A 23-year old Japanese artist by the name of Kenichi created an infographic video for his thesis project in which he took at a look at the country, its people and their culture, not through his own eyes but if it were from a foreigner’s point of view. It’s informative and beautifully designed. Have a look at Japan – The Strange Country below.

See more of Kenichi’s work on his website, www.kenichi-design.com.

[via Design You Trust]

The World of 100

A designer/illustrator by the name of Tony Ng started off with a interesting question, “If the world were a village of 100 people, how would the composition be?” and using statistics from around the world created an awesome set of 20 posters to classify the people in that village by race, age, sex, and a host of criteria.

Entitled The World of 100, the set of posters are design with simplicity in mind but Ng’s clever use of graphics really brings the point home. See some of them after the jump.

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The State of the Internet

We love infographics as moving images, and in “The State of the Internet”, a creative agency by the name of JESS3 has lovingly made a visualization about you, me, and people around the world contribute to the present state of the Intertubes. The figures are staggering. Have a look at the video below.

[via Laughing Squid]

BONUS: If you liked this, you may also like Did You Know 4.0.