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Tag: japan (page 1 of 4)

We Review: Tokyo Mirage Sessions #FE

It should say something about the origins of this game that it was originally titled Shin Megami Tensei x Fire Emblem; it’s got a new name now, but Tokyo Mirage Sessions #FE (pronounced “Sharp FE”) is still a Shin Megami Tensei (or as the fans call it, Megaten) game underneath. I’ve been a huge fan of the Megaten series for years, so I was looking very much forward to getting my hands on Tokyo Mirage Sessions #FE to see what it was about.

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Competitive Dodgeball in Asia

I wasn’t aware that dodgeball was such a highly competitive sport until I watched this video of two teams of schoolkids playing. The video is far more fascinating and watchable than you’d think, too. This naturally meant I needed to go research, so off I toddled. Turns out that Asian dodgeball isn’t the same as American dodgeball; the sport in the video seems more formalized, and with a single ball, although it seems that there are a decent number of variants. The video below features Japan (in blue) vs Hong Kong (red, obviously), and the game is absolutely brilliant. Makes me wish I played this variant as a kid at school.

And of course, if you want some more, here’s a video from the Japanese Nationals.

(Via: WTF Japan Seriously)

Samurai Cat

Look, we get it. Sometimes, a cat is so damn cute that you have to steal it and defend it with all the honour and swordsman skills you can muster. We totally understand the compulsion, so we’re glad that there’s a movie that shares the inner conflict we feel.

[Via: WTF Japan Seriously]

Dancing Cranes

Japanese designer Ugoita T assembles a fabulous quintet of dancing origami cranes. The paper birds shake their tails atop a magnetized stage and go on to produce a most charming dance routine. Check out Dancing Paper below.

Dancing Paper was created for a Honda art event in China.

[via @mindless_pixie]

Umbrellas, Drones, and OK Go

Alt-rock band OK Go trade treadmills for self-balancing unicyles in the music video to their infectious disco tune, I Won’t Let You Down.

The one-take video shot from a camera onboard a multi-copter drone follows the band as they start a synchronized dance riding Honda’s UNI-CUB personal transport devices. The action gets more ambitious and complicated as the camera takes to the skies over Japan’s Chiba prefecture and captures a veritable army of dancers opening and closing their umbrellas in time to the song. It’s a delight but you wouldn’t expect anything less from OK Go. Check it out below.

[via @NeverGlade_ZA]

Blackboard Wars II: Stop Motion Fun

Stop motion animation is something that’s been part of our entertainment for a long time, so it’s fun to see a creative take on it. This particular well-shot fun short film come from Japan, and is called Blackboard Wars II. It mixes up live action with blackboard animation, and does so with brilliant effect.

And if you liked that, there’s more of that sort of thing where it came from.

[via WTF Japan Seriously]

We Review: Okami HD

One of the most beautiful games in existence makes an HD return to the PlayStation. Thanks to the wonderful folks at Capcom, I got a chance to review this game. Does it stand up to memory? Is it still as good as before? Let me paint you a (verbal) picture of what I found.

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“Ukiyo-e Heroes” Turns Video Game Characters Into Japanese Woodblock Art

Illustrator Jed Henry loves the old Japanese art of ukiyo-e, a type of woodblock printing (The Great Wave off Kanagawa is a wonderful example of this technique.) Henry also has a fondness for video games, and as artists like to do, he decided to mash both passions together.

In Ukiyo-e Heroes, Henry has researched and drawn a selection of Nintendo video game characters in the Japanese ukiyo-e style. There are currently 12 designs that feature Mario, Link, Samus, Mega Man, Donkey Kong, Simon Belmont, and a wonderful panel of Street Fighter characters. Have a look at some of Henry’s artwork after the jump.

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Japanese Tron-Inspired Dance Routine

Dance troupe Wrecking Crew Orchestra from Japan channels Tron in one of their recent shows. As it starts, the stage is bathed in darkness, and one by one the members of the group reveal themselves. They’re dressed in special light-emitting glow-suits, and the timing of the lights further enhances their dance routine. Have a look at video below, but beware, it does get a little dubstep-y at the 3:39-minute mark.

[via Kottke]

Lost in Tokyo

Photographer Mark Bramley found himself in Tokyo, Japan for two days. He did what any good photographer might do — he created a time-lapse video of the things and people that he encountered in this most cosmopolitan of cities. Lost in Tokyo comprises 10,000 photos, all shot on a Canon 5D MkII. Check it out below.

[via Coolism TV]