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Tag: NASA (page 1 of 3)

EPIC Time Lapse: A Year in the Life of Planet Earth

The Deep Space Climate Observatory (or DSCOVR) satellite sits 1.5 million kilometres away at what is called Lagrange point 1, a place in space between the gravity of the Earth and the Sun such that the satellite can maintain its stability. Why? For one thing, it enables NASA’s EPIC camera aboard the satellite to capture enough steady shots of the Earth to create this wonderful time lapse video. Watch and listen as EPIC lead scientist Jay Herman takes you though a year in the life of our planet as seen from DISCOVR.

[via Sploid]

Look at This Water Bubble in Space

The astronauts on board the International Space Station have access to a range of sophisticated equipment, including a RED Epic Dragon camera that is capable of shooting video at resolutions to 6K (that is, 6144 x 3160 pixels). Naturally, one of first things the astronauts did was to grow a water bubble, fill it with dye and then dissolve an effervescent tablet in that floating ball of water. The results are superb, check it out below. If you have a monitor capable of displaying 4K, be sure to select the 2160p quality setting for the full effect.

To see more 4K videos from NASA, check out their Ultra High Definition playlist on YouTube.

[via shortlist]

Our Favourite Space Images From 2013

Space is big. Really big. It would take a gargantuan trek of 21.24 billion kilometres for you to reach the outer edges of our solar system, and a further 435 sextillion (that’s 10 to the power of 21!) kilometres to reach the furthest region of the observable universe. There is so much to explore but what we’ve seen so far has been incredibly beautiful.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory keeps an extensive catalogue of cosmic images taken by the various spacecraft up in the heavens. Here’s a small selection of our favourites space images taken in 2013.

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Donald Pettit on Taking Photos in Space

From the vantage of the ISS, we’ve seen some stellar views of Earth at night, striking star trails, and swirling auroras.

Astronaut Don Pettit has spent 370 days in space and is one of the principal photographers aboard the ISS. In a recent photo conference, Pettit gave an illuminating TED-style talk on how photos are captured from space. He talks about taking photographs both inside and outside the ISS, the limitations imposed by the environment, the different cameras that he uses, and the wonderful out-of-the-world scenes that he sees out of the seven windows of the cupola.

[via Photoshelter Blog]

Nocturnal Views From the ISS

Astronauts like Don Pettit see the most fabulous things from the viewports of the International Space Station. This little fly-by video shows a compilation of views from the ISS as it orbits the Earth at night. NASA scientist Dr. Justin Wilkinson serves as our soothing tour guide while the ISS zips over the nocturnal landscapes.

[via Huffington Post]

Out of This World!

If you thought Don Pettit’s star trail photos are out of this world, then you’re sure to appreciate this stellar effort.

A number of people have used NASA’s Image Science & Analysis Laboratory source of photos to create stunning time-lapse videos of the Earth as seen from the International Space Station. The latest video from photographer Knate Myers is no different. Myers adds a touch of Photoshop to enhance some of the NASA shots and uses the tune “Sunshine” by composer John Murphy. Have a look at View from the ISS at Night below.

[via The Verge]

Stellar ISS Star Trails!

The photos of Don Pettit are literally out of this world. The NASA astronaut spends a considerable amount of time aboard the International Space Station, so much so that he has even constructed a device specifically for taking photos of the Earth’s surface from the satellite.

While star trail photography is commonplace, it’d be a treat to see them from a different vantage point and Pettit is happy to oblige. He explains the technique he used to create his ISS Star Trails:

My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.

Have a look at the increbible star trails from space after the jump.

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The Incandescent Sun

Sometimes the boffins over at NASA like to have a bit of fun. Images of the sun captured from their Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission were enhanced, not to add any further scientific value, but to make them look purdy.

The visualization shows the movement of plasma in the sun’s atmosphere. The corona as it is called reaches temperatures of 600000 Kelvin, or 599726.85 degrees Celsius! Have a look at our beautiful Incandescent Sun below.

To download the images and HD video, travel to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

[via Holy Kaw]

“Perpetual Ocean” Visualization Looks Like a van Gogh Painting

Every day it’s swirling. The world ocean is a large body of water that covers over 70% of the Earth’s surface and this beautiful time-lapse animation by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio shows the movement of the ocean currents around the continents and islands.

Using data during the period of June 2005 and December 2007, Perpetual Ocean is produced using a complex computation model that is usually used to predict changes in world’s currents. In this case all the facts and figures have been removed, leaving only the curly and swirly patterns that look like they could be part of the starry nightscape in a Vincent van Gogh painting.

For more information on Perpetual Ocean, visit the Scientific Visualization Studio.

[via @JoeyHiFi]

The Stars

Another day, another time-lapse video. Not that we’re complaining of course. Vimeo user AJRCLIPS collects and edits the open source data from NASA’s Image Science & Analysis Laboratory to show the stars as viewed from different cameras placed aboard the International Space Station. As expected, the views are splendiferous.

[via +Ron Garan]