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Tag: stars (page 1 of 2)

Out of This World!

If you thought Don Pettit’s star trail photos are out of this world, then you’re sure to appreciate this stellar effort.

A number of people have used NASA’s Image Science & Analysis Laboratory source of photos to create stunning time-lapse videos of the Earth as seen from the International Space Station. The latest video from photographer Knate Myers is no different. Myers adds a touch of Photoshop to enhance some of the NASA shots and uses the tune “Sunshine” by composer John Murphy. Have a look at View from the ISS at Night below.

[via The Verge]

Stellar ISS Star Trails!

The photos of Don Pettit are literally out of this world. The NASA astronaut spends a considerable amount of time aboard the International Space Station, so much so that he has even constructed a device specifically for taking photos of the Earth’s surface from the satellite.

While star trail photography is commonplace, it’d be a treat to see them from a different vantage point and Pettit is happy to oblige. He explains the technique he used to create his ISS Star Trails:

My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.

Have a look at the increbible star trails from space after the jump.

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Terra Sacra

Terra Sacra means “sacred earth” in Latin. In the last six years, photographer Sean F. White travelled across all seven of our continents, to 24 countries and captured his views of ancient structures, sweepings vistas, and beautiful night skies. In his breathtaking short film, White features a collection of time-lapse sequences that he shot during his trips.

Accompanied by an original score by Roy Milner, White’s journey takes the viewer through three distinct acts: (I) Primordial Earth, (II) Past meets Present, and (III) Eternal Universe. Have a look at Terra Sacra below.

[via The Awesomer]

Measuring the Universe

The interactive Scale of the Universe shows us how minuscule and gargantuan elements in our universe can be. But just how do we go about measuring the distances from the Earth to these celestial bodies? This charming animated short from the Royal Observatory Greenwich answers that question, explaining the concepts with easy, familiar analogies.

[via Brain Pickings]

The Stars

Another day, another time-lapse video. Not that we’re complaining of course. Vimeo user AJRCLIPS collects and edits the open source data from NASA’s Image Science & Analysis Laboratory to show the stars as viewed from different cameras placed aboard the International Space Station. As expected, the views are splendiferous.

[via +Ron Garan]

Temporal Distortion: An Ethereal Time-Lapse by Randy Halverson

Terje Sørgjerd and Randy Halverson are my two favourite time-lapse photographers. We posted about both of them in the past, and just a few days ago Halverson published his latest video, Temporal Distortion.

Using his custom rig, he shot in central South Dakota, Utah, and Colorado capturing the night skies, aurorae, and the Milky Way. A meteor makes an appearance too, its so-called persistent train lingered in the frame for over 30 minutes but lasts a fleeting second in the video. Temporal Distortion is magical, have a look at it below.

For more technical details on how he created this most amazing video, visit Halverson’s website, Dakota Timelapse.

[via +Randy Halverson]

The Scale of the Universe

We’ve seen enough documentaries to know that the universe is rather large. These shows have compared the relative sizes of the planetary bodies in our solar system and taken us on trips to distant worlds in outer space. And projects like THINGS (The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey) have gone to great ends to catalogue the galaxies that have been observed thus far.

The Scale of the Universe is an informative Flash that shows the universe from the tiniest particles at fractions of a yoctometre (10-24 of a metre) to humans to giant nebulas that look like testicles to the very edge of what we can observe, many many gigaparsecs away.

Take that intergalactic trip in fullscreen here.

The animation was created by a 14-year-old Cary Huang, with help from his twin brother Michael.

[via PS3ZA]

Fleeting Light: Striking Geminid Meteor Shower Time-Lapse

Los Angeles-based photographer and film maker, Henry Jun Wah Lee camped out for three days in the Joshua Tree National Park in southeastern California, and during this visit in December 2010, the photographer witnessed a spectacular thing — the Geminid meteor shower. The meteors in the shower originate from the constellation Gemini and scientists have noted that the numbers seem to be increasing with each year, with sightings of 120 to 160 meteors per hour!

Not all of the light streaks captured in Wah Lee’s time-lapse video are meteors. They tend to appear in one or two frames, the trails that last longer than a few frames are slower moving aircraft. Wah Lee titled his most amazing video, Fleeting Light: The High Desert and the Geminid Meteor Shower, because as spectacular as shower may have been at the time, it is long gone now.

[via The Huffington Post]

Amazing Arizona Landscapes in Time-Lapse

Time-lapse videos are so calming aren’t they? And it seems the state of Arizona provides some wonderful vistas for time-lapse photographers.

Dan Eckert captured the beauty of Arizona in his “hyper lapse” video and now cinematographer Dustin Farrell shows off a year’s worth of time-lapse footage that he made in his home state. In Landscapes: Volume One, Farrell captures the majestic landscapes of Arizona and the incredible city of stars above it. It’s absolutely breathtaking. You must see it.

In his second time-lapse video, Farrell travels to Utah and shoots some of the iconic, rugged landscapes there. Landscapes: Volume Two can be seen after the jump.

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Inside The Milky Way

It’s a city of stars above our heads. The Milky Way is a galaxy that stretches a staggering 600,000 trillion miles from one end to the other. And in this National Geographic TV special, we are taken on a journey through the tumultuous moments in the history of the Milky Way, from the birth of this beautiful spiral galaxy all the way to its eventual death.

One of the images used in the documentary is the 800-million-pixel panorama of the Milky Way created by the Gigagalaxy Zoom project. As grand as the image is, it’s a side-on view of the galaxy that we see and astronomers use all manner of high-tech computer tools to work out what it would like if it were viewed from a bird’s-eye view. Watch part one of Inside the Milky Way below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RsSGLmROQUw

Find the other parts after the jump, or you could just buy the blu-ray.

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