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Tag: time-lapse (page 1 of 8)

EPIC Time Lapse: A Year in the Life of Planet Earth

The Deep Space Climate Observatory (or DSCOVR) satellite sits 1.5 million kilometres away at what is called Lagrange point 1, a place in space between the gravity of the Earth and the Sun such that the satellite can maintain its stability. Why? For one thing, it enables NASA’s EPIC camera aboard the satellite to capture enough steady shots of the Earth to create this wonderful time lapse video. Watch and listen as EPIC lead scientist Jay Herman takes you though a year in the life of our planet as seen from DISCOVR.

[via Sploid]

Time-Lapse of Ice Cream Melting is Delicious, Hypnotic

Summer is on its way to the southern hemisphere and soon the days will be so (unbearably) hot that your ice cream will melt. Speaking of, watch this deliciously hypnotic time-lapse video of ice cream melting.

[via Mental Floss]

Glorious “Little Planet” Time-Lapse of Dubai Airport

The polar panorama effect turns your wide-angle photos into marvellous miniature planets, and we’ve seen nothing as eye-catching as this “little planet” created by Dubai Film.

The Dubai International Airport (IATA location identifier: DXB) is the third busiest airport in the world with over 27 million travellers having used it this year. This mesmerising time-lapse video uses the 88,000 photographs that were captured over a period of 30 hours. The video centres on the DXB control tower as over 1,000 planes land and take off around it. You’ll notice that Terminal 3 serves as the hour hand of a clock and does a full rotation of 24 hours.

The video is shot in glorious 4K and if you like your singers Irish and from the 90s, you’re in for a double treat. You should definitely watch it in HD and in fullscreen.

Click here to play around with an interactive version of this video.

[via Gizmodo]

Waltzing Around Saturn

Not having the best Monday? Boss telling you that you don’t know Uranus from your elbow? I know that feeling too.

Get away from it all (even if temporarily) by watching this most wonderful time-lapse video. The 2.5-tonne spacecraft Cassini–Huygens will be your chauffeur on this tour of the Saturn’s rings and icy moons, set to a dreamy classical piece by Shostakovich.

Around Saturn was put together by Fabio di Donato who pieced together more than 200,000 images taken by the Cassini as it whizzed around Saturn’s rings from 2004 to 2012.

[via io9]

Adrift

San Francisco’s fog is almost as iconic as the city’s Golden Gate Bridge. The foggy weather—a blanket of coastal low-lying clouds—drifts in mainly during the summer months, and has captured the attention of photographer Simon Christen. Over the course of two years, Christen spent many an early morning hiking up to the Marin Headlands, a hilly area with expansive views of the Bay Area.

A collection of his favourite shots, the short film Adrift is Christen’ love letter to the fog of San Francisco. It’s quite magical, check it out below.

[via Mashable]

Watch This Amazing Oil-Painted Music Video

If you loved the stop-motion music video to Shugo Tokumaru’s Katachi (refresh your memory), chances are you’ll appreciate the immense effort that went into creating Blown Minded.

Carine Khalifé is a French visual artist and a dab hand at animation, painting, and photography. She uses those skills to create this amazing stop-motion music video for Canadian indie band, Young Galaxy.

Like sand artist Kseniya Simonova, Khalifé also uses a light box to bring her artwork to life. Working in a dark room, she paints with oils on the glass atop the light box while an overhead camera captures her paintings, frame by painstaking frame. The textures and brush movements in the resulting stop-motion music video are beautiful to behold. Check out Blown Minded below.

[via Neatorama]

Hot, With a Chance of Coronal Rain

Every day is a scorcher on the star at the centre of our solar system. And on some days it even rains.

In mid-July 2012, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured a most beautiful phenomenon that resulted from the combination of solar winds and a solar flare. It’s termed coronal rain.

As the plasma cools and fall back to the surface, the Sun’s magnetic field creates a series of coronal loops that look like they were streams from a sourceless waterfall. The time-lapse video captures a coronal rain shower that lasted 10 hours at temperatures over 49,000 degrees Celsius! See it below.

[via APOD]

Further Up Yonder

Since the beginning of the expeditions, the International Space Station (ISS) has been home to scientists and astronauts from around the world.

These people from the United States, Russia, Canada, Italy, Japan, and Germany have worked in mutual collaboration off the earth, for the earth. This is part of the message in Giacomo Sardelli’s wonderful time-lapse video. In it he stitched together photographs captured from the ISS and included short radio messages recorded by astronauts who gaze upon the Earth and see a world without borders. Have a look at Further Up Yonder below.

To see the video in 2K and how it was made, head over to Sardelli’s blog.

[via PetaPixel]

Under the Skin

The Dermestidae family of beetles have a fondness for eating dead things. Proving yet again that there is no such thing as a free lunch, these little scavengers have to work for their food at the Natural History Museum in London, UK.

When the museum needs to prepare a skeleton for showing in a collection, they don’t use chemicals that can damage the bones. Instead they turn to their tiniest of employees, the Dermestes haemorrhoidalis. Watch as these flesh-eating beetles strip the tissues off a great green macaw, a tawny owl, and a pheasant in this time-lapse video. There is no musical accompaniment so might I suggest you play an appropriate Frank Sinatra song in another browser tab.

[via Obvious Winner]

Donald Pettit on Taking Photos in Space

From the vantage of the ISS, we’ve seen some stellar views of Earth at night, striking star trails, and swirling auroras.

Astronaut Don Pettit has spent 370 days in space and is one of the principal photographers aboard the ISS. In a recent photo conference, Pettit gave an illuminating TED-style talk on how photos are captured from space. He talks about taking photographs both inside and outside the ISS, the limitations imposed by the environment, the different cameras that he uses, and the wonderful out-of-the-world scenes that he sees out of the seven windows of the cupola.

[via Photoshelter Blog]