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Tag: time-lapse (page 2 of 8)

Time is Nothing. Kien Lam’s “Around the World” Time-Lapse

The tag line for Kien Lam’s time-lapse video says it all. “17 Countries. 343 Days. 6237 Photographs. One incredible journey.”

The photographer quit his job one day and travelled on a one-way ticket to London, with his camera firmly in tow. What followed was a chronicle of his journey to 17 countries, from high peaks to lowest troughs. Check out Time is Nothing below.

[via Slxs]

“Natural Phenomena” by Reid Gower

Reid Gower found himself on a 6-month trip travelling between five U.S. states and to seven other countries. He decided to make his first ever time-lapse video. Entitled Natural Phenomena, Gower’s compilation shows not only the beauty of nature but also of our urban jungles.

Aside from the flashing lights, picturesque mountains, shiny sun dogs, and the quintessential aurorae, the video includes a very special view taken from the edge of space. Have a look at Natural Phenomena below.

[via Mashable]

Nocturnal Views From the ISS

Astronauts like Don Pettit see the most fabulous things from the viewports of the International Space Station. This little fly-by video shows a compilation of views from the ISS as it orbits the Earth at night. NASA scientist Dr. Justin Wilkinson serves as our soothing tour guide while the ISS zips over the nocturnal landscapes.

[via Huffington Post]

The Life of Flowers

Vladimir Vorobyov created a mesmerizing time-lapse video of a myriad of flowering plants as they begin to bloom. It’s an explosion of colour timed to a very enthusiastic composition, Happy-go-lucky, by Patrick Hawes. It’s sure to put a smile on your face. It did mine, but maybe I’m easily amused. Check out The Life of Flowers below.

[via Vimeo]

Out of This World!

If you thought Don Pettit’s star trail photos are out of this world, then you’re sure to appreciate this stellar effort.

A number of people have used NASA’s Image Science & Analysis Laboratory source of photos to create stunning time-lapse videos of the Earth as seen from the International Space Station. The latest video from photographer Knate Myers is no different. Myers adds a touch of Photoshop to enhance some of the NASA shots and uses the tune “Sunshine” by composer John Murphy. Have a look at View from the ISS at Night below.

[via The Verge]

Africa in Time-Lapse

We’ve watched and loved time-lapse videos from the likes of Terje SørgjerdRandy Halverson, and Tom Lowe. While these shots are amazing, they’re of the continental United States and parts of Europe, and it’s easy to forget that equally striking scenes can be found in our backyard, and that of our neighbours.

The TIMELAPSE SA channel on Vimeo collects time-lapse footage shot solely by South African photographers and features some wonderful scenes in the Namib desert, the Kalahari, and in the shadows of the Drakensberg mountains. See a few of these videos after the jump.

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Lights Over Lapland

This labour of love took Chad and Linnea Blakley three years to create. What started out as a summer job in Abisko National Park, Sweden quickly turned into an obsession, and Chad found employment at the park’s Aurora Sky Station. Hunting for the phenomenal light display became his day (and night) job.

His time-lapse video of the swirling aurorae over the Swedish skies is composed from 2,000 hours of footage and is free from any type of colour correction. Have a look at the Lights Over Lapland below.

[via Mashable]

Stellar ISS Star Trails!

The photos of Don Pettit are literally out of this world. The NASA astronaut spends a considerable amount of time aboard the International Space Station, so much so that he has even constructed a device specifically for taking photos of the Earth’s surface from the satellite.

While star trail photography is commonplace, it’d be a treat to see them from a different vantage point and Pettit is happy to oblige. He explains the technique he used to create his ISS Star Trails:

My star trail images are made by taking a time exposure of about 10 to 15 minutes. However, with modern digital cameras, 30 seconds is about the longest exposure possible, due to electronic detector noise effectively snowing out the image. To achieve the longer exposures I do what many amateur astronomers do. I take multiple 30-second exposures, then ‘stack’ them using imaging software, thus producing the longer exposure.

Have a look at the increbible star trails from space after the jump.

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Terra Sacra

Terra Sacra means “sacred earth” in Latin. In the last six years, photographer Sean F. White travelled across all seven of our continents, to 24 countries and captured his views of ancient structures, sweepings vistas, and beautiful night skies. In his breathtaking short film, White features a collection of time-lapse sequences that he shot during his trips.

Accompanied by an original score by Roy Milner, White’s journey takes the viewer through three distinct acts: (I) Primordial Earth, (II) Past meets Present, and (III) Eternal Universe. Have a look at Terra Sacra below.

[via The Awesomer]

Aesop Rock’s Graffiti Time-Lapse Music Video is Mesmerising

To promote his new single Zero Dark Thirty, American hip hop artist Aesop Rock enlisted the services of director Isaac Ravishankara and artist Coro to create a mesmerising set of visuals.

Ravishankara set up six Canon DSLR cameras that shot three-second exposures to create the time-lapse video of Coro as he painted a wall for a labour-intensive 10 hours. He then melded the footage of the ever-evolving painting with real-time video of Aesop Rock reclining against the wall on which Coro painted the mural (read the specifics of the production process here).

Zero Dark Thirty is taken from Aesop Rock’s forthcoming album, Skelethon. Check out the music video below.

[via The Huffington Post]