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Tag: aurora borealis (page 1 of 2)

Magnificent “Planet Aurora” Time-Lapse Video by Goran Strand

We love aurorae. So ethereal and majestic, the natural light displays have captured the attention of many a viewer (and photographer).

When a sunspot the size of the Earth produced a coronal mass ejection, Göran Strand a photographer from Sweden happened to be at an ideal place to capture the interaction of Earth’s magnetic field and the solar winds. Over the course of four hours, Strand took 2,464 raw images totalling over 40 GB of data and created a magnificent time-lapse video of the event.

[via @JoeyHiFi]

Donald Pettit on Taking Photos in Space

From the vantage of the ISS, we’ve seen some stellar views of Earth at night, striking star trails, and swirling auroras.

Astronaut Don Pettit has spent 370 days in space and is one of the principal photographers aboard the ISS. In a recent photo conference, Pettit gave an illuminating TED-style talk on how photos are captured from space. He talks about taking photographs both inside and outside the ISS, the limitations imposed by the environment, the different cameras that he uses, and the wonderful out-of-the-world scenes that he sees out of the seven windows of the cupola.

[via Photoshelter Blog]

“Natural Phenomena” by Reid Gower

Reid Gower found himself on a 6-month trip travelling between five U.S. states and to seven other countries. He decided to make his first ever time-lapse video. Entitled Natural Phenomena, Gower’s compilation shows not only the beauty of nature but also of our urban jungles.

Aside from the flashing lights, picturesque mountains, shiny sun dogs, and the quintessential aurorae, the video includes a very special view taken from the edge of space. Have a look at Natural Phenomena below.

[via Mashable]

Nocturnal Views From the ISS

Astronauts like Don Pettit see the most fabulous things from the viewports of the International Space Station. This little fly-by video shows a compilation of views from the ISS as it orbits the Earth at night. NASA scientist Dr. Justin Wilkinson serves as our soothing tour guide while the ISS zips over the nocturnal landscapes.

[via Huffington Post]

Out of This World!

If you thought Don Pettit’s star trail photos are out of this world, then you’re sure to appreciate this stellar effort.

A number of people have used NASA’s Image Science & Analysis Laboratory source of photos to create stunning time-lapse videos of the Earth as seen from the International Space Station. The latest video from photographer Knate Myers is no different. Myers adds a touch of Photoshop to enhance some of the NASA shots and uses the tune “Sunshine” by composer John Murphy. Have a look at View from the ISS at Night below.

[via The Verge]

Lights Over Lapland

This labour of love took Chad and Linnea Blakley three years to create. What started out as a summer job in Abisko National Park, Sweden quickly turned into an obsession, and Chad found employment at the park’s Aurora Sky Station. Hunting for the phenomenal light display became his day (and night) job.

His time-lapse video of the swirling aurorae over the Swedish skies is composed from 2,000 hours of footage and is free from any type of colour correction. Have a look at the Lights Over Lapland below.

[via Mashable]

Terra Sacra

Terra Sacra means “sacred earth” in Latin. In the last six years, photographer Sean F. White travelled across all seven of our continents, to 24 countries and captured his views of ancient structures, sweepings vistas, and beautiful night skies. In his breathtaking short film, White features a collection of time-lapse sequences that he shot during his trips.

Accompanied by an original score by Roy Milner, White’s journey takes the viewer through three distinct acts: (I) Primordial Earth, (II) Past meets Present, and (III) Eternal Universe. Have a look at Terra Sacra below.

[via The Awesomer]

An Enthralling “Celestial Lights” Show

If you’re enthralled by the works of Randy Halverson and Terje Sørgjerd, I think you might take a liking to the latest creation of landscape photographer Ole C. Salomonsen.

Auroras are caused by solar activity, and it is expected that a solar max (the period of greatest solar activity) for our current solar cycle will happen between this year and the next. Noticing an increase in such activity, Salomonsen from Tromsø, Norway pointed his cameras to the aurora-filled skies in the northern parts of this homeland. 150,000 exposures later and he had created a most ethereal time-lapse video, Celestial Lights.

Celestial Lights is Salomonsen’s second video project. His first, In The Land Of The Northern Lights, can be seen after the jump.

Read more

The Stars

Another day, another time-lapse video. Not that we’re complaining of course. Vimeo user AJRCLIPS collects and edits the open source data from NASA’s Image Science & Analysis Laboratory to show the stars as viewed from different cameras placed aboard the International Space Station. As expected, the views are splendiferous.

[via +Ron Garan]

Temporal Distortion: An Ethereal Time-Lapse by Randy Halverson

Terje Sørgjerd and Randy Halverson are my two favourite time-lapse photographers. We posted about both of them in the past, and just a few days ago Halverson published his latest video, Temporal Distortion.

Using his custom rig, he shot in central South Dakota, Utah, and Colorado capturing the night skies, aurorae, and the Milky Way. A meteor makes an appearance too, its so-called persistent train lingered in the frame for over 30 minutes but lasts a fleeting second in the video. Temporal Distortion is magical, have a look at it below.

For more technical details on how he created this most amazing video, visit Halverson’s website, Dakota Timelapse.

[via +Randy Halverson]